Media FAQs

General Replication Questions

What’s the difference between replication and duplication?
What kinds of discs can you manufacture?
How long will it take to manufacture my order?
What is a catalogue number?
What is a glass master?
Who are the PRS for Music?
Do I have to register my pressings with the PRS for Music?
What are ISRC codes and do I need them?

Questions about CD  Production

How do I make a finished CD master?
Can I make my CD master in iTunes?
What is the maximum duration of a CD?
What is the maximum amount of data I can put on a CD?
Will my song titles appear when I put my CD into a computer?

GENERAL REPLICATION QUESTIONS

What’s the difference between replication and duplication?

Disc Replication (or pressed discs) is a process of production where your data is pressed into the surface of the disc. A standard replicated disc has a silver coloured underside.

Duplicated discs (or burned discs) encode your data onto the disc by burning microscopic holes into the dye layer of a recordable CD or DVD. They usually have a tinted coloured underside, often green, blue or purple.
Replication is much more cost effective for orders of over 500 discs; duplication is the better option for smaller orders requiring a faster turnaround. To help you decide which option would work best for you, call our Sales Department on: 020 8691 2121

What kinds of discs can you manufacture?

CD Audio, CD-ROM (PC, Mac, or hybrid), Enhanced CD, DVD-Audio, Single layer DVD (DVD5),
Dual-layer DVD (DVD9), Double sided DVD (DVD10), CD-R, DVD-R, 7” Vinyl, 10” Vinyl, 12” Vinyl, Heavyweight Vinyl, Coloured Vinyl, Lasered Vinyl and many more. We manufacture every commercially released format of disc every day; if you would like to know more contact our Sales Department on 020 8691 2121.

How long will it take to manufacture my order?

The standard turnaround for CD and DVD pressings is approximately 10-12 working days, vinyl, including test pressings is approximately 20 working days; however these turnaround times do increase during busy periods. We suggest you contact us in advance of placing your order to make sure your order will arrive for when you need it.

What is a catalogue number?

A catalogue number is the identification number a record label assigns to a release. It is used for tracking purposes by both the label and the distributor. Catalogue numbers are typically printed on the spine and back of the packaging and on the disc itself.

There are not any rules as to how a label decides to set its catalogue numbers, but once you develop a system, it makes sense to stick with it. Catalogue numbers typically include both numbers and letters – often some portion of the record label name combined with numbers that signify the number of the release for that label.

What is a glass master?

Creating a glass master is the first stage of CD and DVD production. The reason why it is called a glass master is because the information is copied onto a special chemical coating on a circular block of glass. The block of glass is actually much larger than a CD and DVD (they are typically 240mm in diameter and 6mm deep) to facilitate handling and to avoid the sensitive data area from being touched or damaged.

The glass master is polished until it is ultra smooth as even microscopic scratches can affect the quality of the discs being produced.

Who are the PRS for Music?

The PRS for Music (formerly the Performing Right Society) is a royalty collection society that was founded in 1914. The organisation was formed in 1997 as the MCPS-PRS Alliance to bring together two collection societies: the Mechanical-Copyright Protection Society (MCPS) and Performing Right Society (PRS). The PRS for Music brand was adopted in 2009.

When a piece of music is registered with PRS for Music it will allow a songwriter, composer or publisher to begin earning money when it is used. The organisation currently looks after about 10 million pieces of music. By joining PRS for Music a member will ensure they will be paid whenever their music is used. This could be when music is used on a radio station, a TV program or advert or any business using music they’ve created such as shops and offices.

Mechanical rights royalties are different, and are paid to the songwriter, composer or publisher when music is reproduced as a physical product, for broadcast or online.

Do I have to register my pressings with the PRS for Music?

If the music contained on your records contains copyrighted music (including covers) then you will need to apply for a pressings license with the PRS for Music before we manufacture your discs, for more details visit the PRS for Music website at: http://www.prsformusic.com

What are ISRC codes and do I need them?

The ISRC (International Standard Recording Code) is the international identification system for sound recordings and music video recordings. Each ISRC is a unique and permanent identifier for a specific recording that can be permanently encoded into a product as its digital fingerprint. Encoded ISRC provide the means to automatically identify recordings for royalty payments.

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) recommends that all music producers use ISRC. We can add ISRC codes to your CDs in our in-house CD mastering studio, contact our Sales Department for more details.

 

QUESTIONS ABOUT CD PRODUCTION

How do I make a finished CD master?

We recommend your CD masters are either created in professional CD mastering software or are prepared by a professional CD mastering studio. If you would like to know more about our mastering services, contact our Sales Department.

Can I make my CD master in iTunes?

Although it is possible to make your CD master in iTunes it is not recommended. There can be a potential reduction in audio quality, iTunes also doesn’t allow the addition of other important hidden data like ISRC codes and CD-Text.

What is the maximum duration of a CD?

The recommended maximum duration of a CD is 74 minutes, however this can be exceeded to 79 minutes 54 seconds but some CDs made with higher durations may not play on all CD players. If you wish to manufacture discs over 74 minutes a disclaimer will need to be signed.

What is the maximum amount of data I can put on a CD?

The recommended maximum amount of data that can be put onto a CD is 650Mb, however this can be exceeded to 700Mb but some discs that contain more that 650Mb may not read in all CD drives. If you wish to manufacture discs over 650Mb a disclaimer will need to be signed.

Will my song titles appear when I put my CD into a computer?

When album information is displayed on a computer, it’s a result of your CD being registered in an online database (also known as Gracenote). A similar but different technology is that of CD-TEXT, which shows album information that is actually encoded on your supplied master disc. CD-TEXT will only display on players that support it. The most common CD-TEXT capable players available today are modern car stereos. We can add CD-TEXT for you at an additional cost.

If you would like to know more about Gracenote visit their website at: http://www.gracenote.com